#8 Getting Men’s Mental Health Out of The Shadows

men's mental health podcast

Competitive, adventurous, life of the party, a rock.

All things friends might have said about Reid before, through the course of a year, he experienced a series of setbacks: a close friend died, he was laid off and he broke his arm while snowboarding.  Those setbacks put him in a depression that robbed him of his interest in family, friends and getting up into the mountains.

Listen To Episode 8

Show Notes

Armed with a diagnosis, Reid tackled depression like any injury: repair, rehab and build the muscle that reduces the risk of further injury.  Now, as a result of directing the video “Shadows : A Conversation About Men’s Mental Health”, Reid has become a mental health advocate. He encourages men to share their experience of struggling with mental health.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Reid and I discuss why men aren’t good at talking about their feelings.  We make the case that mental and physical health are the same. Reid shares the support he got for mental health at the tech company he works for, and gives a template for the experience everyone should have managing mental health at work.

Links

About Depression

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. This disorder is also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression. Depression affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. Because of those problems, you may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn’t worth living.

More than just a bout of the blues, depression isn’t a weakness and you can’t simply “snap out of”. Depression may require long-term treatment but don’t get discouraged. Most people with depression feel better with medication, psychotherapy or both. People fare best when they commit to working with depression.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#7 Resoul Revolution – Anorexia and Working With Depression

working with depression mental health podcast

Meet Rachel. She’s a coach and the founder of the Resoul Revolution, a transformational retreat for women in leadership.  Rachel is one of millions of people working with depression. In this episode, Rachel tells us about the dark force she experienced as a child but because she didn’t understand it, she described it as a curse that followed her into her adult life. The dark force came and went without obvious cause and she didn’t know what it was. The dark force showed itself in different ways, for example anorexia, bad relationships and getting laid off from work.

Listen To Episode 7

Show Notes

Rachel tried to escape the dark force by making jewelry and becoming a coach, but when it didn’t go away she turned to face it. Following that experience, she now calls it by a different name, depression. She coaches other people working with depression. Then, she tells us how working with depression influences her as a coach, and introduces her new project, the Resoul Revolution.

Links

About Depression

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. This disorder is also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression. Depression affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. Because of those problems, you may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn’t worth living.

More than just a bout of the blues, depression isn’t a weakness and you can’t simply “snap out of”. Depression may require long-term treatment but don’t get discouraged. Most people with depression feel better with medication, psychotherapy or both. People fare best when they commit to working with depression.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#6 Living In The Time of Not Enoughness – Depression

how to manage depression at work mental health podcast

Throughout his career, Kent always tried to help people understand the “why” for their work. That desire lead him to be a recruiter and then an HR leader. It was while leading an HR team that the competing demands of “the system” of work and his own “why” came into conflict. Frozen by the side of the road on his way to work, Kent found himself at the edge of oblivion.  He reinvented himself as an Agent of Evolutionary Change. Now he works with individuals, leaders and organizations, helping them navigate the increasing speed and complexity of modern work through continued personal and professional development. And, while the depression hasn’t left him, he’s learned how to manage depression at work by treating every moment of joy or sadness as a workout. That workout is helping him build the muscle that keeps depression at bay.

Listen To Episode 6

Links

  • WHO Report “Depression Is The Leading Cause of Disability” (article)
  • David White “The Three Marriages: Reimagining Work, Self and Relationship” (book)
  • Deloitte 2018 Human Capital Report “The Symphonic C-suite” (article)
  • Lenny Kravitz – Dream (song)

About Depression

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. This disorder is also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression. Depression affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. You may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn’t worth living.

More than just a bout of the blues, depression isn’t a weakness and you can’t simply “snap out of”. Depression may require long-term treatment but don’t get discouraged. Most people with depression feel better with medication, psychotherapy or both. They can learn how to manage depression at work.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.


#5 Getting OK With Being Good Enough – ADD & Depression

add at work mental health podcast

Richard is a Program Manager living with ADD and depression.  In this episode, Richard walks us through half a lifetime with undiagnosed ADD at work.  His journey to diagnosis starts out as the smart kid who could finish his homework in five minutes and ends as an adult taking on too much responsibility to get the rush of feeling valued.  As a result of “acing” the lab test for ADD, Richard is on a different journey. The journey to getting OK with being good enough.

Listen To Episode 5

Links

About ADD

Attention-deficit disorder (ADD) is a chronic condition that affects millions of children and often continues into adulthood. ADD includes a combination of persistent problems, such as difficulty sustaining attention, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.

Children with ADD may also struggle with low self-esteem, troubled relationships and poor performance in school. Symptoms sometimes lessen with age. However, some people never completely outgrow their symptoms and experience ADD at work. But they can learn strategies to be successful.

While treatment won’t cure ADD, it can help a great deal with symptoms. Treatment typically involves medications and behavioral interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment can make a big difference in outcome.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#4 Feeling Sad Or Feeling Nothing – Depression & ADHD At Work

adhd at work mental health podcast

Jared is a Systems Engineer working in the technology sector. In this episode of Silent Superheroes, we learn that depression distorts Jared’s visual perception of the world and how ADHD is a problem of time management not attention. Jared’s long inventory of medication leads to a discussion of side effects and the complexity of self-monitoring. We discuss how Jared’s interrupt-driven job dictates his priorities and helps him manage ADHD at work, and how keeping busy distracts him from depression. But with systems engineering comes night shifts, and being disconnected from people let his darker thoughts and depression creep in.

Listen To Episode 4

About ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition that affects millions of children and often continues into adulthood. ADHD includes a combination of persistent problems, such as difficulty sustaining attention, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.

Children with ADHD may also struggle with low self-esteem, troubled relationships and poor performance in school. Symptoms sometimes lessen with age. However, some people never completely outgrow their symptoms and experience ADHD at work. But they can learn strategies to be successful.

While treatment won’t cure ADHD, it can help a great deal with symptoms. Treatment typically involves medications and behavioral interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment can make a big difference in outcome.

Getting Help

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#3 Travel and Talking About It – Depression & Anxiety At Work

anxiety at work mental health podcast

Will is an award winning, independent video producer who is outgoing and confident. Because of his confident exterior, you wouldn’t guess he has a lot of doubt and uncertainty. As a result of these thoughts, Will experiences depression and anxiety at work, and in his personal life.  

Listen To Episode 3

Show Notes

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Will talks about the pressures of in-house production that drove him to go out on his own. As a result of founding his own business, Will talks about the benefits and drawbacks of being self-employed. He shares how anxiety distorts his ability to be confident in his work.  We discuss the importance of finding the right therapist. And in conclusion, looking through Will’s eyes I see business travel in a new light.

Links

  • The theory of optimum stress (article)
  • Idiot Brain by Dean Burnett (book)

About Anxiety

Anxiety disorders are real, serious medical conditions – just as real and serious as physical disorders such as heart disease or diabetes. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorder in the United States. You may experience anxiety that is persistent, seemingly uncontrollable, and overwhelming. If it’s an excessive, irrational dread of everyday situations, it can be disabling. When anxiety interferes with daily activities, you may have an anxiety disorder.

The term “anxiety disorder” refers to specific psychiatric disorders that involve extreme fear or worry. The list of anxiety includes generalized anxiety disorder (GAD),  panic disorder and panic attacks, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, selective mutism, separation anxiety, and specific phobias.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.


#2 Heartbreak to Hope – Double Depression

double depression mental health podcast

Alok lives with double depression while having a career in Software Quality Assurance. Alok and I are old friends who met at the final table of a poker tournament. He was the first person to describe depression to me, and it wasn’t until later I realized he had described my experiences. Because Alok shared his experience, I knew where to go when I was diagnosed with bipolar depression. It’s his ability to articulate the depressive experience that makes him a great guest.

Listen To Episode 2

Show Notes

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Alok talks about the middle school heartbreak that introduced him to depression. He shares his long journey with therapy and medication.  We discuss the mundane nature of suicidal ideation and the perceived difference between physical and mental health.  Alok successfully manages his mental health at work, As a result, he offers words of cautious hope to those just starting their journey with double depression.

In addition to his full time job, Alok co-hosts the Race Invaders podcast, an ongoing dialogue about race, politics, and the search for a universal response to oppression.

Links

  • The Race Invaders Podcast (podcast)
  • Robert Sopolsky depression lecture (video)
  • Beck Depression Inventory (resource)

About Double Depression

Double depression is a complication of dysthymic disorder, or dysthymia. Dysthymia is characterized by a chronic, depressed mood combined with one or two other symptoms of clinical depression (such as low energy or low self-esteem). This low, dark mood – that some call the “veil of sadness” – occurs nearly every day and can sometimes persist for many years

Over time, symptoms worsen for more than half of people with dysthymia leading to the onset of a full syndrome of major depression. Double depression is diagnosed when dysthymia and major depression occur together.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#1 From Dean’s List to Desperation and a Workable Plan – Bipolar Type 1

bipolar type 1 mental health podcast

Meet Amanda, a mom working as a pharmacy technician while managing bipolar type 1. In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Amanda relives some of her experiences with undiagnosed bipolar disorder.  Those experiences include making dean’s list during a manic semester and considering suicide while the rest of New York celebrated winning the Super Bowl.  A hospitalization put Amanda on the road to recovery. Despite knowing her bipolar type 1 intimately and having a plan to manage it, the structure of her work  makes maintaining her mental health difficult.

Listen To Episode 1

Links

About Bipolar

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings. Those mood swings include emotional highs called mania or hypomania, and lows called depression. Bipolar disorder used to be called manic depression.

When depressed bipolar patients may feel sad or hopeless and lose interest in most activities. Then, when a patients mood shifts to mania or the less extreme hypomania, patients may feel euphoric, full of energy or unusually irritable. These mood swings can affect sleep, energy, activity, judgment, behavior and the ability to think clearly.

Episodes of mood swings may occur rarely or multiple times a year. While most patients will experience some emotional symptoms between episodes, some may not experience any.Although bipolar disorder is a lifelong condition, patients manage mood swings and other symptoms by following a treatment plan. In most cases, bipolar disorder is treated with medications and psychological counseling.

Getting Help

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.