When A Good Night’s Sleep Isn’t Enough – Narcolepsy At Work

As Shannon read the driving direction, she fell asleep again. This wasn’t the first time, in fact, she’d done it after every direction. Her inability to stay awake had become a problem, and she decided to finally see a doctor. The doctor informed her she has narcolepsy.

Narcolepsy is a rare neurological condition that disrupts sleep patterns. Disrupted sleep leads to sleep attacks, the sudden need to sleep during the day. It can also cause sleep hallucinations and sometimes cataplexy, which is sudden loss of muscle control.  These symptoms all make it challenging to manage narcolepsy at work.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, we’ll learn what narcolepsy and how it’s different than feeling sleepy a lot.  Shannon explains how and why she got diagnosed, and the surprising preferred way she manages narcolepsy at work. Shannon will share her experiences working with narcolepsy and share a few simple things that a business can do to support a narcoleptic employee.

Links

  • Geniuslink, the company Shannon co-founded (business)
  • The Research Is Clear, Long Hours Backfire (article)
  • Xyrem Patent Dispute (article)

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience living with, and managing, mental illness. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

You can help others find the Silent Superheroes podcast by leaving us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.

Purgatory in Paris – The Road To A Mental Health ERG

Max was 20, in an unfamiliar neighborhood in Paris, thousands of miles from home, desperately unhappy and in tears.

Depression can take a grip on anyone, at any time. Imagine being a 20 year old student, doing an internship in a foreign country that involves calling hairdressers all day and asking them how much a haircut costs. In addition to a boring internship, your family, friends and new girlfriend are thousands of miles away, and your host family is mainly in it for the money. These are the circumstances that overwhelmed Max and lead him to wander the streets of Paris in his depression. Fortunately, Max is the son of a clinical psychologist and he recognized the signs of depression. On returning to the US, he sought care and began a program of treatment.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Max tells the story of his internship in Paris that lead him to seek treatment for depression and anxiety. Because he’s tried many medications, he’ll talk about some of the more serious side effects he’s experienced with them. He’ll also talk about some of the questionable therapists he’s worked with and we’ll discuss the complexity of mental health care under the US healthcare system. Max will share his plan for his Mental Health ERG (Employee Resource Group) at Limeaid.

CORRECTIONS : Max asked to correct two things he said in the recording. Klonopin is a Schedule IV drug, not Schedule I as he said in the recording. In addition to that correction, Gregory Peck was chairman of the American Cancer Society.

Note : If you are a member of a mental health ERG at your workplace I’d love to talk to you. Please reach out via the contact form at www.silentsuperheroes.com.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience living with, and managing, mental illness. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

You can help others find the Silent Superheroes podcast by leaving us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.

Feeling sad or feeling nothing, Jared’s journey with ADHD & Depression

Jared is a Systems Engineer working in the technology sector. In this episode of Silent Superheroes, we learn that depression distorts Jared’s visual perception of the world and how ADHD is a problem of time management not attention. Jared’s long inventory of medication leads to a discussion of side effects and the complexity of self-monitoring. We discuss how Jared’s interrupt-driven job dictates his priorities and helps him manage ADHD at work, and how keeping busy distracts him from depression. But with systems engineering comes night shifts, and being disconnected from people let his darker thoughts and depression creep in.

Getting Help

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience with mental illness.  They are not trained medical professionals.  If you are considering making a change to your treatment plan, please contact a medical professional.

Take your mental health seriously. If you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

To help others find the Silent Superheroes podcast please leave us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.

Heartbreak to Hope, Alok’s Journey With Double Depression

Alok lives with double depression while having a career in Software Quality Assurance.  In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Alok talks about the simple middle school heartbreak that introduced him to depression and his long journey with therapy and medication.  We discuss the mundane nature of suicidal ideation and the perceived difference between physical and mental health.  Alok successfully manages his mental health at work and offers words of cautious hope to those just starting their journey with depression.

Alok is the host of the Race Invaders podcast, an ongoing dialogue about race, politics, and the search for a universal response to oppression.

Links

  • The Race Invaders Podcast (podcast)
  • Robert Sopolsky depression lecture (video)
  • Beck Depression Inventory (resource)

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience with mental illness.  They are not trained medical professionals.  If you are considering making a change to your treatment plan, please contact a medical professional.

Take your mental health seriously. If you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

To help others find the Silent Superheroes podcast please leave us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.