#26 Doing The Hard Work – Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Depression

panic disorder anxiety depression mental health podcast

Andrew is the CEO of mental health startup Heard who are creating a trusted space for therapists.  Becoming a CEO wasn’t always on the cards for Andrew.  Early in life, he was beset with panic disorder, anxiety and depression and as a teenager he did drugs and ran with the wrong crowd.  At his worst he had a stomach full of pills and a revolver in his mouth.

Listen To Episode 26

Everyone likes a good rags to riches redemption story, the homeless person who becomes a radio presenter again, the kid from the projects who becomes an international musician.  Andrew started on the wrong path but that’s not the story here.  This is a story about putting in the work and grinding it out.  Some of the work is stuff we all do to build a life, like studying at college and climbing the corporate ladder.  The real story is the work Andrew has done and is doing on the inside to face and come to terms with his mental illness, and working on the scars of a traumatic past.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Andrew gives an inside look at his panic disorder, anxiety and depression.  He talks about the mental health resources PWC offered, and also some of the gaps in their offering.  Finally, he tells what he and his co-founders at Heard are doing to bring mental illness out of the shadows.

Links

About Support

A panic attack is a sudden episode of intense fear that triggers severe physical reactions when there is no real danger or apparent cause. Panic attacks can be very frightening. When panic attacks occur, you might think you’re losing control, having a heart attack or even dying.

Many people have just one or two panic attacks in their lifetimes, and the problem goes away, perhaps when a stressful situation ends. But if you’ve had recurrent, unexpected panic attacks and spent long periods in constant fear of another attack, you may have a condition called panic disorder.

Although panic attacks themselves aren’t life-threatening, they can be frightening and significantly affect your quality of life. But treatment can be very effective.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#25 Situational Depression With Taylor Comeau

taylor comeau mental health podcast

Taylor Comeau ‘s retirement from professional soccer helped her realized mental health is as important as physical health. At the end of her she started experiencing situational depression and sought help from a therapist. Situational depression is a short term, stress related type of depression.

Listen To Episode 25

Show Notes

I’m a huge fan of soccer. I don’t remember the exact moment I became a fan, but it feels like forever.  As a fan, I sit on my couch or in the stadium, following the rollercoaster journey of supporting my team.  I’d always wondered, what’s it like to be on the pitch with thousands of fans watching.

I connected with Taylor via some friends at Modern Health, where she is working in sales.  After looking her up on LinkedIn I learned that she’d paid professional soccer. Excited, I reached out and set some time to meet.  I know it takes a lot to reach the pro level in most sports.  Even talented athletes that work incredibly hard don’t make the grade.  As I started to ask Taylor about her journey and how it affected her mental health, I started to understand the relentless drive it takes to make it and the sacrifices you make along the way.  Sacrifices that surely affect your mental health.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Taylor Comeau shares her experience growing up in a family of athletes and the competitive culture of the Bay Area.  After that, she talks about the drive it took to succeed and the difficult decisions and tradeoffs she made. She talks about the conflict between her desire to continue to grow her career and the need to be able to spend more time with family and friends.  Finally, she recalls how she had to confront her situational depression and shares how she’s doing now.

About Situational Depression

Situational depression is a short-term, stress-related type of depression that can develop after you experiencing a traumatic event or series of events. It can make it hard for people to adjust to everyday life following a traumatic event. Situational depression is also known as reactive depression. Situational depression can be triggered by problems at work or school, illness, death of a loved one, moving and relationship problems.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#12 Purgatory in Paris – The Road To A Mental Health ERG

mental health ERG mental health podcast

Max was 20, in an unfamiliar neighborhood in Paris, thousands of miles from home, desperately unhappy and in tears. More than a decade later he was founding a mental health ERG. This is his story.

Listen To Episode 12

Show Notes

Depression can take a grip on anyone, at any time. Imagine being a 20 year old student, doing an internship in a foreign country that involves calling hairdressers all day and asking them how much a haircut costs. In addition to a boring internship, your family, friends and new girlfriend are thousands of miles away, and your host family is mainly in it for the money. These are the circumstances that overwhelmed Max and lead him to wander the streets of Paris in his depression. Fortunately, Max is the son of a clinical psychologist and he recognized the signs of depression. On returning to the US, he sought care and began a program of treatment.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Max tells the story of his internship in Paris that lead him to seek treatment for depression and anxiety. Because he’s tried many medications, he’ll talk about some of the more serious side effects he’s experienced with them. He’ll also talk about some of the questionable therapists he’s worked with and we’ll discuss the complexity of mental health care under the US healthcare system. Max will share his plan for his Mental Health ERG (Employee Resource Group) at Limeaid.

CORRECTIONS : Max asked to correct two things he said in the recording. Klonopin is a Schedule IV drug, not Schedule I as he said in the recording. In addition to that correction, Gregory Peck was chairman of the American Cancer Society.

Note. If you organize a mental health ERG at your workplace I’d love to talk to you. Please reach out at [email protected].

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.

#3 Travel and Talking About It – Depression & Anxiety At Work

anxiety at work mental health podcast

Will is an award winning, independent video producer who is outgoing and confident. Because of his confident exterior, you wouldn’t guess he has a lot of doubt and uncertainty. As a result of these thoughts, Will experiences depression and anxiety at work, and in his personal life.  

Listen To Episode 3

Show Notes

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Will talks about the pressures of in-house production that drove him to go out on his own. As a result of founding his own business, Will talks about the benefits and drawbacks of being self-employed. He shares how anxiety distorts his ability to be confident in his work.  We discuss the importance of finding the right therapist. And in conclusion, looking through Will’s eyes I see business travel in a new light.

Links

  • The theory of optimum stress (article)
  • Idiot Brain by Dean Burnett (book)

About Anxiety

Anxiety disorders are real, serious medical conditions – just as real and serious as physical disorders such as heart disease or diabetes. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorder in the United States. You may experience anxiety that is persistent, seemingly uncontrollable, and overwhelming. If it’s an excessive, irrational dread of everyday situations, it can be disabling. When anxiety interferes with daily activities, you may have an anxiety disorder.

The term “anxiety disorder” refers to specific psychiatric disorders that involve extreme fear or worry. The list of anxiety includes generalized anxiety disorder (GAD),  panic disorder and panic attacks, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, selective mutism, separation anxiety, and specific phobias.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.


#2 Heartbreak to Hope – Double Depression

double depression mental health podcast

Alok lives with double depression while having a career in Software Quality Assurance. Alok and I are old friends who met at the final table of a poker tournament. He was the first person to describe depression to me, and it wasn’t until later I realized he had described my experiences. Because Alok shared his experience, I knew where to go when I was diagnosed with bipolar depression. It’s his ability to articulate the depressive experience that makes him a great guest.

Listen To Episode 2

Show Notes

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Alok talks about the middle school heartbreak that introduced him to depression. He shares his long journey with therapy and medication.  We discuss the mundane nature of suicidal ideation and the perceived difference between physical and mental health.  Alok successfully manages his mental health at work, As a result, he offers words of cautious hope to those just starting their journey with double depression.

In addition to his full time job, Alok co-hosts the Race Invaders podcast, an ongoing dialogue about race, politics, and the search for a universal response to oppression.

Links

  • The Race Invaders Podcast (podcast)
  • Robert Sopolsky depression lecture (video)
  • Beck Depression Inventory (resource)

About Double Depression

Double depression is a complication of dysthymic disorder, or dysthymia. Dysthymia is characterized by a chronic, depressed mood combined with one or two other symptoms of clinical depression (such as low energy or low self-esteem). This low, dark mood – that some call the “veil of sadness” – occurs nearly every day and can sometimes persist for many years

Over time, symptoms worsen for more than half of people with dysthymia leading to the onset of a full syndrome of major depression. Double depression is diagnosed when dysthymia and major depression occur together.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are sharing their opinions about mental health and mental illness. They are not giving advice. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

Because you listened to the  podcast, you can help others find it by leaving us a review on iTunes. Or if you don’t use iTunes, leave a review on your favorite podcasting service.