Finding Perspective, Bipolar and Alcoholism at Work

By day, Daniel is a sales manager at a credit card processing company and by night he’s a stand up comedian. Bipolar and alcoholism bring a unique perspective to Daniel’s work. As a stand up comedian, his life provides plenty of material, and his bipolar means he’s two comedians in one. As a sales manager, he’s able to stay calm and not be driven by the potential for success and failure. Because of his illnesses, Daniel has an honesty and an insight about him that cuts through the day-to-day business bullshit. As one of his colleagues, he makes work interesting and fun.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, we get to know Daniel a lot better.  He talks about comedy, and how bipolar means he’s two different comedians in one performer.  He shares the advice he got from a homeless woman in Central Park, that lead him to sobriety.  And finally, he reflects on the slightly nihilistic outlook on life, that helps him keep things in perspective.

Links

Here’s some places to find Daniel :

As a result of Daniel’s Instagram, I’ve just had a fit of laughter.

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience living with, and managing, mental illness. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

You can help others find the podcast by leaving us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.

Marnie’s Mental Health Management Masterclass

Marnie works at Expedia helping teams tell stories, which she describes as her dream job.  Like me, Marnie lives with undiagnosed bipolar. She went through two marriages and divorces before an offhand comment in an acting class nudged her to explore her mental state.

In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Marnie shares the comment made by her acting teacher that lead to her bipolar diagnosis.  We role play how a manager or HR professional should handle a conversation with an employee with mental illness. Marnie explains her thorough, structured way for identifying medication side effects.  And in addition to that, she reflects on the positive and negative ways the mania part of her bipolar has affected her career.

Please note, due to an equipment problem there are occasional audio dropouts in this episode. Typically the dropout causes a missing word or part of a word.

Links

  • An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield (book)
  • Expedia, Marnie’s employer (company)

Getting Support

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience living with, and managing, mental illness. For that reason, please consult with your care provider before making a change to your treatment approach.

It’s important to take your mental health seriously. Consequently, if you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

You can help others find the podcast by leaving us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.


From dean’s list to desperation and a workable plan, Amanda’s journey with bipolar type 1

Meet Amanda, a mom working as a pharmacy technician while managing bipolar type 1. In this episode of Silent Superheroes, Amanda talks about her experience living with undiagnosed bipolar disorder.  Experiences that range from making dean’s list during a manic semester, to considering suicide while the rest of New York celebrated the New York Giants winning the Super Bowl.  Hospitalization put Amanda on the road to recovery, but despite knowing her bipolar type 1 intimately and having a plan to manage it, the  structure of her work  makes maintaining her mental health difficult.

Links

Getting Help

Remember, the people you hear on Silent Superheroes are people talking about their personal experience with mental illness.  They are not trained medical professionals.  If you are considering making a change to your treatment plan, please contact a medical professional.

Take your mental health seriously. If you need to speak to someone you can call 1-800-273-8255, or text crisistextline.org on 741741. Both provide 24×7 confidential counseling to people in the United States. Worldwide visit http://iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

To help others find the Silent Superheroes podcast please leave us a review on iTunes or your favorite podcasting service.